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4 Day Linux Kernel Internals and Development in Israel - January 2017

בהמשך להצלחה בחג החנוכה, ועקב בקשות למופע נוסף לאלו שלא הספיקו להשיג אישורים תקציביים מהחברות שלהם, רון מוניץ ילמד בסוף חודש ינואר קורס פומבי בנושא פיתוח קרנל, ואינטרנלס.
הקורס הינו קורס רשמי של ה Linux Foundation.
הקורס מתאים למפתחי קרנל עתידיים\נוכחיים שרוצים לעשות סדר בדברים, ולמומחי אבטחת מידע.
הקורס יערך במרכז הארץ או בחיפה (כתלות בנרשמים המהירים), בשפה העברית, בתאריכים הבאים:
22 בינואר, 23 בינואר, 1 בפברואר, 2 בפברואר. הקורס מפוצל לשני שבועות, בכדי להקל על חברות - (וגם כי רון עסוק בין לבין :-) )

להצעת מחיר והרשמה ,יש לשלוח מייל ל training@thepscg.com

שימו לב שהקורס הוא תנאי חובה למגיעים למופעי קורסי אבטחת ודיבאגינג הקרנל שיינתנו בחודש פברואר ומרץ, וחוקרים בלי נסיון משמעותי בקרנל לא יוכלו להרשם לקורסים הבאים מבלי לקחת את הקורס הנוכחי.




Linux Kernel Internals and Development (LFD420)

Length: 4 Days

Type: Hands-On

Target Audience: Prospective Linux Kernel developers, security researchers, board designers, system administrators, Real-Time/embedded engineers making the transition to Linux, device drivers developers.


Prerequisites:

  • Essential:

    • The attendees should proficient with C and assembly language

  • Recommended:

    • Working knowledge of Linux command line tools

    • Previous Device Driver or Embedded Linux experience


Summary:

Linux Kernel Internals and Development course provides experienced programmers with a solid understanding of the Linux kernel. Upon mastering this material, you will have a basic understanding of the Linux architecture, kernel algorithms, scheduling, hardware and memory management, modularization techniques and debugging, as well as how the kernel developer community operates and how to efficiently work with it. The course includes extensive hands-on exercises and demonstrations designed to give you the necessary tools to develop and debug Linux kernel code.

The course is based on both the most upstream recent Linux kernel version, and maintains compatibility with the kernel versions used by at least the last two releases of the major Linux distributions.

Note: The course can be customized to a 5 day version which includes more debugging material.


Outline:

  1. Introduction

    • Objectives

    • Who You Are

    • The Linux Foundation

    • Linux Foundation Training

    • Course Registration

  2. Preliminaries

    • Procedures

    • Things change in Linux

    • Linux Distributions

    • Kernel Versions

    • Kernel Sources and Use of git

    • Platforms

    • Documentation and Links

  3. Kernel Architecture I

    • UNIX and Linux **

    • Monolithic and Micro Kernels

    • Object-Oriented Methods

    • Main Kernel Tasks

    • User-Space and Kernel-Space

    • Kernel Mode Linux **

  4. Kernel Programming Preview

    • Error Numbers and Getting Kernel Output

    • Task Structure

    • Memory Allocation

    • Transferring Data between User and Kernel Spaces

    • Linked Lists

    • String to Number Conversions

    • Jiffies

    • Labs

  5. Modules

    • What are Modules?

    • A Trivial Example

    • Compiling Modules

    • Modules vs Built-in

    • Module Utilities

    • Automatic Loading/Unloading of Modules

    • Module Usage Count

    • The module struct

    • Module Licensing

    • Exporting Symbols

    • Resolving Symbols **

    • Labs

  6. Kernel Architecture II

    • Processes, Threads, and Tasks

    • Process Context

    • Kernel Preemption

    • Real Time Preemption Patch

    • Dynamic Kernel Patching

    • Run-time Alternatives **

    • Porting to a New Platform **

  7. Kernel Initialization

    • Overview of System Initialization

    • System Boot

    • Das U-Boot for Embedded Systems**

  8. Kernel Configuration and Compilation

    • Installation and Layout of the Kernel Source

    • Kernel Browsers

    • Kernel Configuration Files

    • Kernel Building and Makefiles

    • initrd and initramfs

    • Labs

  9. System Calls

    • What are System Calls?

    • Available System Calls

    • How System Calls are Implemented

    • Adding a New System Call

    • Replacing System Calls from Modules

    • Labs

  10. Kernel Style and General Considerations

    • Coding Style

    • kernel-doc **

    • Using Generic Kernel Routines and Methods

    • Making a Kernel Patch

    • sparse

    • Using likely() and unlikely()

    • Writing Portable Code, CPU, 32/64-bit, Endianness

    • Writing for SMP

    • Writing for High Memory Systems

    • Power Management

    • Keeping Security in Mind

    • Mixing User- and Kernel-Space Headers **

    • Labs

  11. Race Conditions and Synchronization Methods

    • Concurrency and Synchronization Methods

    • Atomic Operations

    • Bit Operations

    • Spinlocks

    • Seqlocks

    • Disabling Preemption

    • Mutexes

    • Semaphores

    • Completion Functions

    • Read-Copy-Update (RCU)

    • Reference Counts

    • Labs

  12. SMP and Threads

    • SMP Kernels and Modules

    • Processor Affinity

    • CPUSETS

    • SMP Algorithms - Scheduling, Locking, etc.

    • Per-CPU Variables **

    • Labs

  13. Processes

    • What are Processes?

    • The task_struct

    • Creating User Processes and Threads

    • Creating Kernel Threads

    • Destroying Processes and Threads

    • Executing User-Space Processes From Within the Kernel

    • Labs

  14. Process Limits and Capabilities **

    • Process Limits

    • Capabilities

    • Labs

  15. Monitoring and Debugging

    • Debuginfo Packages

    • Tracing and Profiling

    • sysctl

    • SysRq Key

    • oops Messages

    • Kernel Debuggers

    • debugfs

    • Labs

  16. Scheduling Basics

    • Main Scheduling Tasks

    • SMP

    • Scheduling Priorities

    • Scheduling System Calls

    • The 2.4 schedule() Function

    • O(1) Scheduler

    • Time Slices and Priorities

    • Load Balancing

    • Priority Inversion and Priority Inheritance **

    • Labs

  17. Completely Fair Scheduler (CFS)

    • The CFS Scheduler

    • Calculating Priorities and Fair Times

    • Scheduling Classes

    • CFS Scheduler Details

    • Labs

  18. Memory Addressing

    • Virtual Memory Management

    • Systems With no MMU

    • Memory Addresses

    • High and Low Memory

    • Memory Zones

    • Special Device Nodes

    • NUMA

    • Paging

    • Page Tables

    • page structure

    • Kernel Samepage Merging (KSM) **

    • Labs

  19. Huge Pages

    • Huge Page Support

    • libhugetlbfs

    • Transparent Huge Pages

    • Labs

  20. Memory Allocation

    • Requesting and Releasing Pages

    • Buddy System

    • Slabs and Cache Allocations

    • Memory Pools

    • kmalloc()

    • vmalloc()

    • Early Allocations and bootmem()

    • Memory Defragmentation

    • Labs

  21. Process Address Space

    • Allocating User Memory and Address Spaces

    • Locking Pages

    • Memory Descriptors and Regions

    • Access Rights

    • Allocating and Freeing Memory Regions

    • Page Faults

    • Labs

  22. Disk Caches and Swapping

    • Caches

    • Page Cache Basics

    • What is Swapping?

    • Swap Areas

    • Swapping Pages In and Out

    • Controlling Swappiness

    • The Swap Cache

    • Reverse Mapping **

    • OOM Killer

    • Labs

  23. Device Drivers**

    • Types of Devices

    • Device Nodes

    • Character Drivers

    • An Example

    • Labs

  24. Signals

    • What are Signals?

    • Available Signals

    • System Calls for Signals

    • Sigaction

    • Signals and Threads

    • How the Kernel Installs Signal Handlers

    • How the Kernel Sends Signals

    • How the Kernel Invokes Signal Handlers

    • Real Time Signals

    • Labs


** These sections may be considered in part or in whole as optional. They contain either background reference material, specialized topics, or advanced subjects. The instructor may choose to cover or not cover them depending on classroom experience and time constraints


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